So I’m faulty…

“… it’s like having a camera and ignoring it. Seeing obstacles but backing out anyway, running things over.”

“He’s never going to change. I’ve told him over and over what he is doing is killing our marriage, but he refuses to see any of his faults.”

“I can’t keep a job more than a few months. I get fired over stupid things. Bosses just want us all to conform. Who can work in an environment where you can’t be yourself?”

Is it possible that we have faults we can’t see? Faults that others recognize and bring to our attention, but we refuse to see? And if we changed, or even worked on these faults, could we save a friendship, a job, a marriage or a family tie?

In a recent post, I talked about worth. That if we are rejected, whether it be personal, professional, or romantic, it doesn’t diminish our worth. That is true. It does not however, mean that we are not at fault ever. Part of accepting ourselves is looking honestly at our whole being, good and bad. And just because we accept our faults, that doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t work on those things to make them better. Especially if they are continually being brought to our attention and affecting our relationships.

In 1955, two psychologists, Joseph Lutz and Harrington Ingham, came up with a technique called the Johari Window. (Joseph + Harrington = Johari). The Johari Window has four panes: one is the part of ourselves that we and others see; one contains aspects that others see but we are unaware of; one is the private space we know but hide from others; one is the unconscious part of us that neither ourselves nor others see. Let’s put a pin in that for now.

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I drive a Challenger. It’s my dream car. I waited all through undergrad and grad school, got a job and worked there for two years, before I bought my car. My car is everything I wanted it to be. I only have one complaint, it has a terrible blind spot. The way the back windows are made, you can’t see when you back out. I usually have to back out slowly and hope for the best. That’s scary. When I can, I find a space I can pull through so I can avoid backing up. It’s really a hazard. I’m seriously contemplating getting a back up camera to help me out.

Okay, let’s go back to the window. The Johari window can help us with a number of things, but let’s focus on that pane that others see and we don’t. This could be filled with all kinds of positive adjectives that others see in us and we don’t recognize in ourselves. It can also be filled with negative adjectives that others see in us and we don’t recognize in ourselves. We have blind spots. Things in our lives that we can’t see. It’s a hazard to our relationships, no matter what the type.

The people in our lives are the back up cameras. They are trying to help us out. If I get a camera and never turn it on or ignore it, what help is that? If you never consider what others are telling you, or examine it to see if it is true, it’s like having a camera and ignoring it. Seeing obstacles but backing out anyway, running things over. You can choose that. It’s an option. But, it’s a reckless way to live your life. A destructive way that will end in you being alone. You can also choose to change, or get help changing if you don’t know how. Don’t let your pride keep you from your best life.

Be kind, be grateful, be courageous,

Jules

So I’m shifting…

It’s been a little over 8 months since my dad died. I’m still figuring my grief out.  This week has been a struggle. It happens. This morning I’m coming out of a four day funk that was really hard. But, today seems better. If you’ve lost someone you love, you know. I wrote my feelings. Maybe the words will resonate with some of you.

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At first, my grief made me feel as though I was adrift in a dark ocean.  Tossed about, at the mercy of the waves. One day, I realized I had washed upon the shore. Laying on my belly, exhausted, but on the ground in the light. Still later, I found myself standing, but the sand under my feet was shifting and not predictable. Recently, I felt as though I found my footing. Sand that is mostly packed, that holds me steady as I go through the day. But, it’s still sand. Some days, with unpredictability, the sand under my feet shifts. I’m unsteady, tentatively taking steps to see if I sink. Some days I can’t. It’s too much work. So I stay still. And then, just like that, I stand again, unfounded confidence urging me to move forward. I accept the cycle.  Right now I can’t imagine that solid ground is an option. Then again, at one point I didn’t imagine that sand was an option to being tossed in the waves. So I’ll keep moving forward. Allowing myself kindness and compassion for the unsteady days. Enjoying the sun on my skin, and the feeling of the water washing over my toes. Knowing he loved to see me smile.

Be kind, be grateful, be courageous,

Jules

So….I’m valuable.

If they have no perceived power over our value, then we no longer have the need to beg, coerce, manipulate, or perform for them.

I pulled a crisp new twenty dollar bill from my wallet. She watched me quietly. “How much is this worth?” I asked. “Twenty dollars.” she replied. I crumpled it up in my hand. “How much is this worth?” I asked again. “Still twenty dollars.” she said with a quizzical look. I threw it on the floor and enthusiastically stomped on it. “How much now?”. “Still twenty.” she20.jpg smiled this time knowing where I was going. I took the twenty and carefully straightened it out. “It’s a little bit weathered now, from all the mistreatment, but it’s value is still the same. This is you.” I held out the twenty with the wrinkles and creases. She teared up. “You are so valuable. You hold so much worth. And yes, some people in your life haven’t recognized that. Some people have crumpled you up and stomped on you. But it didn’t change your worth. It didn’t change your value. It says more about them then it says about you.” We sat in silence while she contemplated my illustration. She cried quietly. I waited silently, giving her space to experience her emotions. “No one has ever told me that.” she said. “I always thought that if someone rejected me it meant there is something wrong with me.” She sat quietly again. Then she whispered, “But it doesn’t have to does it?” I smiled as I could see her rolling new thoughts around, trying them on like a new outfit, turning this way and that as she formed an opinion on them.

When we let the opinions of others form our opinion of our self, we are in danger of our value being determined by the acceptance or rejection they give us. There is internal validation and external validation. Internal validation come from inside us. It’s our own knowledge of who we are, good and bad, and our acceptance of that. External validation comes from outside of us. It’s the opinions of others based on our looks, our opinions, our performance, our actions, etc. We are a culture of judges. We feel we have the right to judge others constantly. I do it. I comment on people on TV, on their actions, their outfits, their opinions. Isn’t that the point of reality TV? To make us all judges? I don’t do it as often in real life. I’m pretty okay with letting others be who they are, but it’s not always easy. As a friend once told me, “I’m aware of my faults and I’m working on them.”

We all want positive external validation. It’s human nature. An acknowledgement of our effort, a compliment on our looks, a respect for our opinion, appreciation of our work. It feels really good. But what if we don’t receive it? Or even worse, what if we are rejected? I’ve been rejected. It hurts. It can make us question ourselves. It can make us lose our confidence. It can make us feel worthless and fragile. But it doesn’t have to does it?

If you can do the work to honestly know who you are, not the you meeting others expectations, not the you on social media, not the you that’s your front, but the authentic you. with all your imperfections and quirks and awesome qualities. If you do the workmirror.gif and face who you are, and become friends with that you, and accept yourself completely, no one can make you feel worthless again. Your value is then based on your internal validation. If external validation comes, YAY! soak it in, delight in the feeling. But, if no validation comes, or rejection comes, you will know that you are still the same person, and that rejection takes nothing away from who you are. It still hurts, but it doesn’t destroy.  You’ll be a bit more weathered from all the mistreatment, but your value will remain the same.

Once we are able to accept who we are, we can let others be who they are. We no longer need others to agree with us, because it’s no threat to our worth if they don’t. It frees us up to experience others in a new way, not needing anything from them. If they have no perceived power over our value, then we no longer have the need to beg, coerce, manipulate, or perform for them. We can enjoy others with no fear.  And that is a beautiful way to live your life.

Be kind, be grateful, be courageous,

Jules

So I’m loved…

“I often write about things that keep coming up in sessions. It seems like a lot of hurting people (all of us, right?) need to hear that they are precious and treasured and unconditionally loved.”

He looked at me with tears in his eyes. “Jules, I’m trying to wrap my head around that.” He said he had always known it, but never felt it. We joked about the great distance it is between our head and our heart. Literally only about 12 inches, but a great distance exists between knowing something is true in your brain, and knowing it is true in your heart. He said he has always been good at the head part, but not so great at the heart part. He admitted that working on the heart part is not historically in his comfort zone, but he’s starting to warm up to it.

What I had told him was that God loves him. Not because of anything he has done, but just because he is His. This idea of unconditional love. The idea that you are loved not for your performance, not for your behavior, not for any reason other than you are created by God and He loves you. This was mind blowing. Heart breaking in the best sense.

You don’t believe in God? Ok. He still loves you. You don’t acknowledge God? Romans 829
Ok. He still loves you. You have done a thousand terrible things? Ok. He still loves you. You struggle with your faith? Ok. He still loves you. You can’t escape it. You can’t make it go away. You can’t make Him stop.

He won’t force it on anyone. It’s there. Freely for you to have. But, it’s always your choice. Even if you don’t accept it, He still loves you.

I always told my kids, “I don’t love you because you are smart, or funny or kind, even though you are those things, I love you just because you are mine.” There is nothing my kids can do to make me stop loving them. They could reject me, disown me, stop acknowledging me, and it would break my heart. But, guess what? I would still love them. That’s my choice, not theirs.

And, if I, a simple, flawed, imperfect human can love like that, just imagine how much more God can love. How perfectly and purely and wholly God can love. It’s not about religion, it’s about relationship.

not so powerfulI often write about things that keep coming up in sessions. It seems like a lot of hurting people (all of us, right?) need to hear that they are precious and treasured and unconditionally loved. When that moves from your head to your heart…that’s powerful stuff. It’s overwhelming. To feel and know in your heart that you are loved despite your mistakes, despite your unbelief, despite…well, anything.  Sit back and immerse yourself in that love. Rest in that love and let it fill you with a peace that you are searching for. Sink into that love and find acceptance.  Snuggle into that love and stop struggling.

It’s here. It’s happening right now. You are being loved. You are being pursued. As you read this you are being treasured and prized and adored. It’s here. That’s His choice. Can you accept it? That’s your choice.

Be kind, be grateful, be courageous,

Jules